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PoleSphere Review

PoleSphere Review

2020 has been a strange year. The world has changed, and the way we train has changed with it. Without access to pole studios, many polers rushed to buy home poles, only to find themselves at a loss for what and how to train. Luckily, there are a number of online pole...

Share the love and support your home studio or fave pole brand

Share the love and support your home studio or fave pole brand

Welcome to the Australian Pole Directory! I can't tell you how excited I am that you're here! This website was my #isoproject, my way to be connected to the pole industry while we were all effectively confined to our homes, as well as being my way to help support and...

An Interview with Nikki McLennan of Lioness Photography

An Interview with Nikki McLennan of Lioness Photography

A few weeks ago, while I was still in the process of preparing the Australian Pole Directory for launch, I started chatting online to Nikki McLennan of Lioness Photography. We made a connection, and decided to have a chat - we've both been around the block a few times...

How to choose a pole for home use

How to choose a pole for home use

It's an exciting day for you - you've decided to buy a pole for home! You've started shopping around, and you've realised that it's not as straightforward as "just buying a pole". After a quick google search, you're overwhelmed, asking yourself:  Should I buy a pole...

BREAKING NEWS: X-Pole Australia shipping/delivery delays.

BREAKING NEWS: X-Pole Australia shipping/delivery delays.

UPDATE 22/06/2020: X-Pole Australia has received their shipment, approximately 1 month later than expected. They are in the process of preparing the orders to be sent out, and have reminded people who are waiting on their deliveries that it can take 7-10 days from...

So you’ve bought a home pole… What’s next?

by | Jul 5, 2020 | Pole Products, Pole Services | 0 comments

It’s an exciting day for you! You figured out which home pole was right for you, you’ve ordered it and it’s winging it’s way to your door.

HOW EXCITING!

The first step is to figure out where to put it for a safe poling experience.

If your new pole is a pole stage, you’re pretty well set. As long as the stage area is clear, you’re good to go.

If your new pole is tension mounted or a fixed pole, the officially recommended clearance around the pole has a radius of at least 1.5 metres. This is adequate for most pole moves and combos. If you’re doing a lot of floorwork or big, dynamic movements, you’re going to want more space.

It’s also ok to have less space if you don’t have a choice. But please, before you practice, make sure the floor space around your pole is clear. The last thing you want if you happen to fall (and we’ve all fallen at some stage) is to land on anything else that could injure you worse than the floor.

The next step is to figure out what to do now that you have a pole! Sounds simple, right? Well, as someone who has a home pole (or technically… 3 home poles), and a decent amount of pole experience under her belt, I can tell you, home poling requires a plan.

If you’re reading this, I’m going to assume you’re in one of two situations:

  1. You have very little, if any pole experience. You LOVE the idea of pole, and want to get started. Maybe you’re also attending pole classes in a studio, maybe not.
  2. You do have a decent amount of pole experience. You are comfortable on the pole and have a good sense of at least the basics.

I’m going to address each scenario separately. You can click either option to jump directly to the relevant part of the article.

You’re new to pole, and you’ve decided that home poling is right for you.

Congratulations and welcome to what could very well be the best thing you’ve ever done. Pole is an incredible sport, with a pretty damn amazing community. I hope it changes your life the way it has changed mine.

I would also like to offer this reminder:

POLE IS AN EXTREME SPORT.

The potential for injury in pole is very real, so I would encourage you to follow some form of a structured training plan. Preferably one designed by a qualified professional.

It can be super tempting to just browse Instagram for inspiration. You might think that #beginnerspole is a good place to start, but it’s not. I’ve just checked, and there are plenty of examples of intermediate and advanced moves under these hashtags. It can be hard for the untrained eye to figure out what is actually a beginners move.

Option 1: Face-to-face training

I always have, and always will recommend that anyone new to pole do SOME in-person training if at all possible. Absolutely nothing can replace the hands-on guidance of an expert when you’re learning this brand new skill set.

Option 2: Live online training

I’m also a realist, and I know that for many people particularly in regional Australia, there are simply no accessible pole studios. This is where the lockdowns have been a wonderful thing for home polers. Because of the forced closures, SO many studios had to pivot to offering online classes.

With lockdowns being for the most part lifted, many studios have kept an online component to their business model.

If you can’t make it to a physical studio, the next best thing would be a studio that offers live online classes. In a small group live online class you still have expertly trained eyes watching you, even if they’re not physically by your side. I’d recommend advising the studio that you’re brand new to pole before registering for any classes. They should then advise you of the most appropriate class/es for you to join.

(P.S. Did you know that you can filter our Pole Studio Directory by studios that offer live online classes?)

Option 3: On-demand online training

The third option I would recommend if you’re not able to attend a physical studio OR live online classes would be on-demand online studio. BE SELECTIVE – not all online studios are created equal. Some are more suitable for intermediate or advanced polers, but there are some online studios that are ideal for beginners. You want to find one with clear learning pathways.

Studio Veena offers a comprehensive beginners curriculum including a 30 days take-off, to teach absolute beginners the fundamentals of pole. They also have a fairly active forum of members hosted on their website. PoleSphere is another on-demand online studio that is great for beginners (and it’s Aussie!). It offers more of a “choose your own adventure” structure, but in a clear, easy to understand way, with pre-requisites, regressions, progressions and recommendations offered based on your training. They also have an active community on Facebook where you can ask questions and share your successes.

A few things to remember:

  • Pole is HARD WORK. Don’t be discouraged if you struggle to get your feet off the ground, or if you feel completely lost, or if climbing the pole (or any other trick) completely eludes you. All good things come with time and practice.
  • Inverting (going upside-down on the pole) is NOT a beginner move!! It requires a great deal of strength and control to perform a safe invert. If you want to start inverting on the pole, this blog by The Pole Physio is a great place to start. She breaks down the how and why of the muscles used to perform a chopper (a more advanced variation of a basic invert). If you scroll to the bottom of the article, you’ll see links to the rest of the series, where she offers conditioning exercises to help you build the strength and control to safely invert.
  • Crash mats are important. They are probably not going to be necessary when you very first start your pole adventure, but as soon as you start training anything at height, or inverted, I personally believe they are a necessity. Go follow @polelols on Instagram for the #polefail videos, and you’ll probably agree with me.
  • Get a mirror if you can. Sometimes, just being able to check yourself out in the mirror can help you get a better understanding of the move you are trying to achieve, or where your body is in space.
  • Record yourself. A lot. You will feel like you’re doing all the right things, but watching a recording will help you to pick up area for improvement.

You’re NOT new to pole, and you’ve decided to either complement your training with a home pole, or shift your training entirely to home.

Look, if you’re at least somewhat experienced on the pole, I’m going to assume that you know the potential for injury with pole, and that you feel confident to train in a safe manner.

The thing that you might struggle with, is making the time to use the pole you’ve just bought.

I know many people assume that having a home pole means they will be motivated to train ALL THE TIME. And you will be. For about 2-3 weeks. Then there’s a very good chance that the pole will end up as an abandoned fixture in your space. It has happened to many polers I know (including myself, on more than one occasion).

I know you don’t want this to happen, so I’m going to share the things that help me to maintain my home poling routine.

If possible, have your pole in a high-profile place in your home. Make it a space you WANT to be in.

If you’ve made the (not insignificant) investment in a home pole, I’m going to assume that pole is an important part of your life. So, if possible with your living situation, give it an important space in your home.

I’ve owned a home pole for ~14 years. I have been most active in my home poling routine when my pole has been IN MY FACE for my daily activities. This has historically meant that my pole was a fixed feature of my living room, and very hard to ignore.

I’m now lucky enough to have a dedicated home studio. It’s located in a high-profile area in our home. It’s a part of the greater living space, and my desk for work (I work from home for my 9-5) is set up in the same space. I’ve set this space up exactly how I want it, and I love being in here.

Whenever I have tried having the pole set up in a spare bedroom, or some other out-of-the-way space in my home, I have completely neglected my home practice.

Schedule your pole time into your diary.

“If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail.” I’m sure you’ve heard this old chestnut. In my experience, it is absolutely true. I live by my google calendar, and if I don’t schedule my training in, it simply doesn’t happen.

I used to have the mindset of “if my pole is there in front of me, I will use it”. And to a degree, that was true. I would do a little chair-spin every now and again as I walked past it, but I didn’t schedule my training, so I didn’t actually train.

I now have a finely tuned schedule of recurring events in my calendar. This helps me to ensure I set aside dedicated time to train at home every week.

Accountability is your friend.

In my humble opinion, one of the best things to come out of Iso-life is the rise of the live-stream online pole class. I have a 5-second commute from my lounge room to my home studio as opposed to a one-hour commute to the studio. I also love that with a live-stream class, you are accountable to show up.

Don’t get me wrong, a good on-demand training session can be amazing, but for me, committing to be in a certain session at a certain time is a huge motivating factor.

If you don’t have access to live-streamed online classes, find other ways to be accountable. I have a friend who comes to my home once per week to jam with me on the pole. I also try to schedule regular online training sessions with my other friends with poles. There are many ways you can hold yourself accountable for your training plans.

Questions? Comments?

I hope you’ve found this article to be helpful on your journey into home-poling. If you have any other questions, drop them in the comments below.

If you’re an experienced home pole dancer, what are your top tips for success?

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69 Holbeche Road, Arndell Park , Blacktown, New South Wales 2148, Australia
PoleSphere Review

PoleSphere Review

2020 has been a strange year. The world has changed, and the way we train has changed with it. Without access to pole studios, many polers rushed to buy home poles, only to find themselves at a loss for what and how to train. Luckily, there are a number of online pole...

Share the love and support your home studio or fave pole brand

Share the love and support your home studio or fave pole brand

Welcome to the Australian Pole Directory! I can't tell you how excited I am that you're here! This website was my #isoproject, my way to be connected to the pole industry while we were all effectively confined to our homes, as well as being my way to help support and...

An Interview with Nikki McLennan of Lioness Photography

An Interview with Nikki McLennan of Lioness Photography

A few weeks ago, while I was still in the process of preparing the Australian Pole Directory for launch, I started chatting online to Nikki McLennan of Lioness Photography. We made a connection, and decided to have a chat - we've both been around the block a few times...

How to choose a pole for home use

How to choose a pole for home use

It's an exciting day for you - you've decided to buy a pole for home! You've started shopping around, and you've realised that it's not as straightforward as "just buying a pole". After a quick google search, you're overwhelmed, asking yourself:  Should I buy a pole...

BREAKING NEWS: X-Pole Australia shipping/delivery delays.

BREAKING NEWS: X-Pole Australia shipping/delivery delays.

UPDATE 22/06/2020: X-Pole Australia has received their shipment, approximately 1 month later than expected. They are in the process of preparing the orders to be sent out, and have reminded people who are waiting on their deliveries that it can take 7-10 days from...

Sara-May Monaghan

Sara-May Monaghan

Australian Pole Directory Founder

Sara-May is passionate about pole. She did her first pole class at Bobbi’s in 2006. 

After repatriating to Australian in late 2019, she struggled to find the right studio, her favourite polewear brands and the other poling resources she needed. As a result of this, the Australian Pole Directory was born.

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